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Cuty
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Joined: 09/28/2016 - 09:04
child's trust

Hi guys. Today I want to ask all of you about a very important issue for all future or the real parents. How to earn the trust of your child? I am sure that very often it is really difficult. Also, I heard that we have to work at it really hard when a child has a little age. Because when your child becomes a teenager, his opinion could change about everything that surrounds it. All this because his head is formed inside a person. It starts to become independent and to realize that the world is much more complicated than it used to be for him. Therefore, at this age he can completely lose confidence in you. Therefore the child to believe in you all the time, we have to work on it since childhood. But how should we achieve this? :unsure:

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Cuty
Last seen: Never ago
Joined: 09/28/2016 - 09:04
child's trust

Love does not come easy and its main foundations are trust and security. If these two exist in a parent-child relationship, it will be easier to deal with more difficult situations. Trust, safety and love are interlinked and nurturing these three things is essential to a happy family life and a happy childhood for your children. Building trust with your child is similar to leadership. If the leader does the right thing, the people he or she is leading will follow. If you tell your child to eat vegetables and you do not eat them yourself, then you are sending the wrong message. Build the bond between you and your child by practicing what you preach.

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70

Moro
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Joined: 09/02/2016 - 08:18
child's trust

Most adults do not develop good listening skills when talking to their own kids. This is wrong. You should always listen to what your child has to say for you to gain his trust. Do not use judgemental statements or come to the discussion with your own agenda. By knowing that you are listening, your child will feel more comfortable talking to you more openly about his life. Telling your child the truth from the very beginning will result in a strong bond and of course, trust, comes along with it. As much as possible, deal with your child or children on an honest level; for example, if he or she asks if an injection from the doctor will hurt -tell the truth in the most age-appropriate way.

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898

Henk
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Joined: 09/28/2016 - 09:10
child's trust

Promises should Not be Broken! Do not make promises to your children if you cannot keep them. This can be quite a challenge as situations may change. However, try and make an effort as breaking promises could be devastating to your relationship with your child. If you say you are going to watch a soccer game in the weekend, make sure you will do just that because if you don't, the next time you promise something, they will doubt if you are really serious about it. If it seems that you might not be able to keep your promise, tell your child in advance and explain why. If your child did something wrong and you threaten him that he won't have TV for a week -make sure you can implement what you say.

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1093

Kris
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Joined: 09/28/2016 - 09:10
child's trust

This is not a case of martial law; it is just a case of sticking to your word. Amazingly, this builds trust with your child. Appreciation of Honesty! Make it clear to your children that you appreciate it when they are honest. This will build a very trusting relationship between you and your child. Aside from that, you will be helping your child in becoming a person of integrity. As the saying goes -say what you mean and mean what you say. If you are spouting house rules be sure that you implement them. Make your children understand your expectations as well. It should be as clear as day. Make sure that you do not constantly change the rules so that your children will have no doubts about you at all.

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1094

Dasty
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Joined: 09/28/2016 - 09:10
child's trust

You’re being tested! If they can trust you with the little stuff, they’ll come to you with the big stuff. Kids don’t just come up to a parent and say things like “I know you want me to get As in school and I have a chance to cheat on the test; what should I do?” or “I’m bulimic.” Parents have to earn that kind of trust. How? Listen to your little ones when they want to tell you all the details of their day. The ins and outs of the preschool playground may not rivet you, but communication habits start early. Do you listen when she prattles on interminably about her second grade friends, even when you have "more important" things to think about?

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Cuty
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Joined: 09/28/2016 - 09:04
child's trust

It’s hard to pay attention when you’re rushing to pick up food for dinner and get home, but if you aren’t really listening, two things happen. You miss an opportunity to learn about and teach your child, and she learns that you don’t really listen, so there’s not much point in talking. Train yourself to listen and not over-react. Kids are afraid they’ll create an even bigger problem by talking with their parents. Prove they can trust you to support them without losing your cool when they’re being bullied on the playground and you’ll get to hear about the boys in their crowd shoplifting when they’re a few years older.

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70

Johny
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Joined: 09/28/2016 - 09:10
child's trust

In tough moments, breathe. Listen. Get yourself calm before you even open your mouth. When you do, start from the assumption that your child will have definite ideas about how to solve this problem, and with your support, can sort out some solutions. Keep confidences. Remember how embarrassed you felt when your dad blurted out in front of the relatives that you were terrified of spiders? Or your mother called the neighbors to share what you'd told her about their daughter? Consider everything your kids tell you as privileged information. If you think you need to share it with anyone else for any reason -- even your spouse -- let your child know.

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1091

Cuty
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Joined: 09/28/2016 - 09:04
child's trust

Start small. When your kids are little, start talking about the hard things, from special circumstances like being a single parent or Grandpa’s alcoholism, to the conversations that unnerve most parents, like sex. If you breathe and act natural, and keep your references short and matter of fact, sooner or later you’ll feel natural, and your kids will be comfortable building on those discussions to ask questions and talk about their own feelings. Research shows that kids in families that tackle tough issues early are more likely to consult their parents as teens. Tell the truth. It's tempting to tell your child that shot won't hurt when she's hysterical at the doctor's office.

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Cuty
Last seen: Never ago
Joined: 09/28/2016 - 09:04
child's trust

To get trust you must earn it. You earn trust by listening and understanding without judgement. You earn trust by verifying your understanding by asking questions. You earn trust by being present and genuine in your responses. You earn trust by explaining there are ways you can see to improve your child's experience -- and then asking if s/he wants to hear your opinions. You earn trust by stating your opinion when asked to do so but respecting your child's autonomy and not opining when uninvited to do so. You earn trust by noticing when improvements or positive changes occur, and praising the process honestly.

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Chaki
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Joined: 09/28/2016 - 09:10
child's trust

You earn trust by being a consistent partner walking through Life beside your child, one s/he can rely on as in 'two heads are better than one'. You earn trust by being able to see things through your child's eyes and, without judgment, help your child figure out how s/he can set and accomplish goals. Do celebrate when s/he feels s/he has done something worthy of special notice. When you demonstrate over time that you are able to restrain yourself and act in a manner which provides your child with accurate feedback consistently, you will have earned the trust you want, and your relationship will be built on feelings of sufficiency: your child feels safe and is secure when you focus on her or him.

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